How To Raise A Daughter: Guide For Dads

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A Guide To Talking Puberty & PeriodsStrong

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Here are some tips on talking puberty and periods – and general advice on how to raise a daughter for dads.

Let’s be honest: talking about puberty and periods with your daughter is something that most dads prefer to leave to their partner or another significant female in the family.

But by showing her that you’re comfortable talking about periods – and being there for her when she needs you – you can help boost her confidence.

Father and daughter talking while sitting on a bedFather and daughter talking while sitting on a bed

1

Open up an emotional dialogue

Don’t let the first time you discuss anything personal be when she starts her period. A top tip on how to raise a daughter for dads is to ask questions – and listen!

Just as you’d want to know what’s going on at school, ask her about her feelings. Fathers raising daughters will find that this makes those period conversations much easier when the time comes.

Father and daughter laughing while looking at a laptopFather and daughter laughing while looking at a laptop

2

Do your homework

Watch Your Menstrual Cycle & PeriodsWatch Your Menstrual Cycle & Periods

The menstrual cycle explained in 3 minutes - Watch the video

Download our Always Changing & Growing Up Parents Guide for more information.

Daughter and father sitting on the floor drinking tea and looking at each other while smilingDaughter and father sitting on the floor drinking tea and looking at each other while smiling

3

Start conversations early

You need to ensure that your daughter has the facts before she enters puberty, so start discussing puberty and periods from the ages of 7 or 8. If she’s already started showing the first signs of puberty, it’s definitely time to talk.

The first signs of puberty

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  • Starting to develop breasts
  • Getting taller
  • Becoming curvier
  • Getting spots / greasy hair
  • Experiencing mood swings
  • Discharge in her underwear
  • Growing pubic hair
Dad and daughters watching TV from the couchDad and daughters watching TV from the couch

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Keep it casual

Having ‘the talk’ as a one-off can overwhelm her with information, so address the subject in easy stages to help build your daughter’s knowledge.

Look for natural moments to talk – say, when watching an advert or film or buying period products.Fathers raising daughters often find this kind of conversation uncomfortable, so try discussing periods where there’s less need for eye contact, such as in the car.

How To Raise A Daughter: Guide For Dads - Statistic image

63% of people in the UK believe we should speak openly about mensturation*

*Source: Glocalities

Daughter and father looking at a laptop screenDaughter and father looking at a laptop screen

5

Don't give her the brush-off

If you don’t know the answer to a question, it’s OK to admit there are holes in your knowledge. Say you’ll find out the information she needs and get back to her – and make sure you do. You don’t want her to think you’re embarrassed or dodging the subject!

Daughter and father laughingDaughter and father laughing

6

Mark the 'big moment' in a small way

When she does start her period, don’t make a big deal of it. Say something like, ‘You may not want to talk to me about this now, but if you ever need anything, you only have to ask’.

Chances are she’ll roll her eyes and say, ‘Oh Dad!’ but a few kind words can demonstrate that you’re there for her.

Family buying bathroom miscellaneousFamily buying bathroom miscellaneous

7

'Period-proof' the bathroom!

Girls can get very embarrassed about being on their period, so on top of making sure that she has period products available, provide a lidded bin (with bin liner) so she doesn’t feel awkward disposing of used products.

Make sure you teach her the motto: Bin It – Don’t Flush It! Period products, or any other toiletries, shouldn’t be flushed because doing so can cause blockages in the drainage system.

Woman's hands holding Always sanitary pads packagingWoman's hands holding Always sanitary pads packaging

What period products should she use

There are so many different types of pads (wings, no wings, day- time, night-time) and tampons (with or without applicator, plastic or cardboard) – not to mention period pants and menstrual cups!

Here’s what you need to know when working out which period products she should use.

  • Let her experiment and find out what works best for her.
  • It’s OK for her to use tampons, but most girls prefer to start with pads as they’re easier to use.
  • Always Ultra pads are a great place to start, because they use special technology that turns liquid into gel – and gel doesn’t leak!
  • Help her find the right-sized pad by using the Always My Fit chart.
Find Your Fit
Take our Puberty & Period Myths Busted Quiz

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Puberty & Period myths busted

Read the Always Changing & Growing Up Parents

Parent's Guide

Download our Always Changing & Growing Up Parents Guide for more advice on puberty and periods

Watch Your Menstrual Cycle & PeriodsWatch Your Menstrual Cycle & Periods

The menstrual cycle explained in 3 minutes - Watch the video

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